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recommended bed in america. >>> new nuclear fears in japan. officials say a partial meltdown is likely happening now and multiple meltdowns are a real possibility. >>> unbelievable amateur video at the moment the tsunami hit. water pouring in, flooding cars and everything in its way in miyako, japan. more amazing pictures next. hi, everybody. great to have you with me today. i'm thomas roberts. this is the continuing coverage of the disaster in japan. it's 12 noon in the east and 2:00 a.m. monday in japan. three major stories developing now in that country. up first, sobering words from japan's prime minister. he says the earthquake and tsunami disaster is the nation's worst crisis since world war ii. meanwhile, workers at a nuclear power plant hit by the earthquake and tsunami are trying to keep temps down to prevent the disaster from grewing worse. the escalating crisis includes the threat of multiple meltdowns. >>> more than 200,000 people have been forced to evacuate a 12-mile radius around nuclear plants. japan's chief cabinet secretary says nine people tested positive for high ra
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
up right after this. see you. tuesday. disaster in japan. another explosion in fukushima. radiation from the blast reportedly blowing offshore. then a nuclear watchdog group upgrading the severity of the situation a 6 on a 7-point scale. chernobyl was a 7. 3 mile island was a 5. we are somewhere in between both of those in a moment. alisyn: the situation seem to be getting more dangerous. all four reacto rereacross -- as seem to be affected. listen to the prime minister. >> the radiation level is high and there is a high chance of further radiation from here on. anyone within a 20-mile range of fukushima needs to evacuate. i understand most people did. and we urge people within a 20-30 mile range to stay indoo indoors. bill: this is the plant in question. there are four different reactors that are of concern. here is number one, here is number two, number 3 and number 4. all of these reactors on the picture you see now. this is how they were intact before the earthquake happened and the tsunami wiped them out. here is where we are now. saturday you reactor number one you had an expl
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
. everything else is the little stuff. we wish japan well and in a weird way we thank them for bringing us back to reality. we are there, good day. >> hello eeverybody. i am uma live in washington. america's news headquarters. just when japan thought it couldn't get worse fears surface of a melt down after an explosion in the nuclear power plant in the northeast. the death tollcontinue to rise with entire towns missing. david piper, what is the latest on the struggling nuclear plant that is taking place there? >> well, earlier in the day there was a large explosion and the japanese government said it destroyed the walls that are encircling the nuclear reactor but didn't break the metal consuming tower that protects the reactor from escaping. from what we are hearing at this time, workers are pouring sea water on the reactor to try to cool it down. but at the same time we are hearing reports that 190 people are suffering from radiation sickness and there are reports that there has been some release in the air at this time. the japanese government increased the raduous around the plant to protect
. >> a fox urgent, nuclear crisis in japan. i'm harris falkner, we're live with a special edition of fox report. a new threat of multiple reactor meltdowns and frantically trying to cool down the reactors with sea water and are' looking at the two plants in question, fukushima where there's been at least one explosion and the other, where we're getting word now radiation levels have dropped back to normal after what they're doing there for the problem. japan's prime minister speaking about friday's twin disasters, the earthquake and tsunami and now the nuclear threat. his words through a translator. >> 65 years after the end of world war ii, this is the toughers and most difficult for japan in that period. >> harris: we're just starting to get some satellite images. this is sendai, the epicenter of the quake. before on the left side of the screen and after. you can see how a torrent of tsunami driven mud ripped through the covered ground here. the government confirming now more than 2500 buildings in that city destroyed. scientists have just revised their estimates now how big that earth
alert. t the disaster in japan keeps getting worse. japanese officials confirm that a meltdown could be occurring and we will have the latest. >> dave: this as the death toll is rising, the number of people killed could top a staggering 10,000 in one state alone. >> clayton: take a look at this, satellite image showing what a city in japan looked like before and then after the tsunami. stunning images show how powerful the natural disaster really was. "fox & friends," hour two, starts right now. . >> dave: for many of you it's hour number one, those of you that didn't spring forward and get the clocks reset. it is hour number two. >> clayton: and a lot happening. the nuclear explosion in one of the plants was-- the word from the government that the plant is on the verge of a meltdown. >> alisyn: hard to know. what's the late s, david. >> reporter: there's a warning from the government that there could be an explosion at the plant, there's been a build up of hydrogen, different from the one yesterday and warning that there could have been already a partial meltdown of one of the unit
. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 point. it mentioned it opened down nearly 300 points earlier. today one of the biggest aftershocks to hit japan s
-ft. worth airports, radiation levels, thankfully low, have been picked up on passengers returning from japan. but the battle and the focus remain on the fukushima station and its crippled reactors. reactor number three, the scene of aerial water bombardment today, brave crew members dropped sea water in a desperate attempt to cool what is being describes as the single greatest threat. the fukushima six reactors, reactor three is the only one housing a mixed fuel known as mox, short for mixed oxide, a material made of reclaimed plutonium, the release of which would pose far more devastating effects than weave seen thus far. reactor four and its lack of water set off the biggest rift between nuclear authorities in the united states and japan. the u.s. believes the situation there is far worse than the japanese counterparts concede. the rift has led to a mini exodus of americans and others within japan. let's go now to nbc's chief environmental affairs correspondent, anne thompson. authorities in japan have just announced they may be close to restoring power to a stricken reactor, that's reacto
you next fox news sunday. >> a fox urgent tsunami warning issued for japan. after a 6.5 magnitude earthquake has hit off shore. this coming from the japan meteorology agency, the tsunami could be 1.6 feet and as we know, the size is deceiving when it comes in and how the wave comes in and how much it can take when it goes back out. dominique dei-natale with the latest on this. >> reporter: harris, it happened just 30 minutes ago. the details we have at the off the coast, which is supposed to be fukushima nuclear plant having the problems from the results of the tsunami and earthquake. and taking the height, 1.6 as well, but it's not about the height of the wave it's actually the back distance of the wave, how high it is, and goes back, and the force that it will bring it it hits shore. we haven't had confirmation whether the tsunami has happened, but probably in at that area, as result of the march tsunami. the wave touched in and big enough (inaudible) it will just drag even more around and the recovery process going on up there, particularly difficult. and where the united stat
>>> welcome to nhk news world line. the u.s. embassy announced the head of japan affairs at the state department kevin maher has been fired. visiting u.s. assistant secretary of state kurt campbell, in facted him of the move on thursday in their talks on thursday. they say a former deputy chief will assume the post. maher reportedly told some college students in the u.s. last december that okinawans are masters of manipulation and extortion. he was referring to the relocation of a u.s. marines air space station in the southern most prefecture. in the talks with takeaki matsumoto, campbell said maher's comments are unacceptable and contrary to u.s. policy and its respect for the people of okinawa. >>> japan's two major stock exchange operators will explore the possibility of consolidating their businesses. the talks will be aimed at bolstering japan's standing in the world equity market, amid growing pressure for realignment in the industry. if they agree to integrate operations it will have a listing of 4,000 stocks, rivaling the world's leading forces. the two will likel
ahead. >>> also the disaster in japan. the nuclear radiation contaminates food and another powerful aftershock rocks the area near that troubled power plant. >>> and comparisons to chernobyl. how does the japan nuclear crisis compare with the world's worst nuclear accident? we'll take you to chernobyl, some 25 years after that catastrophe. >>> good morning. welcome to "msnbc saturday." i'm alex witt. just past 9:00 on the east. 6:00 a.m. out west. what's happening for you. dramatic twists on the ground in libya are putting more fresher on international leaders to launch a military response. gadhafi's army rolled into the rebel stronghold of agabenghazi battling rebels in the street. >>> and secretary of state clinton meeting with officials about taking military action in libya. and jim maceda is with us from tripoli. get to benghazi. first up, called the rebel capital. what do we know about the situation there this morning? >> reporter: hi again, alex. the situation is not looking good at all for those rebels in their capitol and for the civilians. the people who live 670,000 of the
from the people of japan? the special comment coming up. >>> it's hard to believe, but with each passing hour the situation in japan is becoming more dire and dangerous. and today, this. another explosion rips through a nuclear containment building and this, the safety system at a third nuclear reactor within the stricken fukushima plant breaking down. the reactor's fuel rods exposed for more than two hours. and officials seem unable to determine just how much water remains, as they seek to prevent a full-scale meltdown. beyond the dangers surrounding nuclear plant, there's widespread suffering from sendai to tokyo. millions are facing a mull tide of challenge. officials struggling to balance rescue efforts to reach survivors, distribute aid and bury the dead. a thousand bodies washed ashore in the last few hours. search and rescue teams from some 13 countries have now converged on what will be a lengthy and complex operation. frantically working to find any survivors from the upgraded 9.0 magnitude earthquake and tsunami. in all, nearly 10,000 people have been rescued, while ten
'm harry smith. also tonight, one week after japan's earthquake and tsunami a big break for the engineers trying to prevent a nuclear meltdown. and kids from around america and haiti, too, do what they can to help the people of japan. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> smith: good evening, katie is on assignment. president obama delivered a warning today to libyan dictator moammar qaddafi: stop slaughtering your people or face military action. the united states will help enforce a no-fly zone approved last night by the u.n. security council, but no american ground troops will be sent to libya. french and british warplanes could be in the air over libya by tomorrow. hours after the u.n. resolution passed, the qaddafi regime declared a cease-fire, but his forces reportedly kept shelling two cities-- misurata and ajdabiya. and there are also reports that qaddafi's forces are headed toward benghazi, the rebels' capital. david martin at the pentagon begins our coverage. david, good evening. >> reporter:
>> couric: tonight, from the air and from the ground, japan launches a water assault on those damaged nuclear reactors to try to cool them. and a voluntary evacuation of americans is under way. i'm katie couric. also tonight, president obama tries to reassure this country we are safe. >> we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the west coast. >> couric: libya's moammar qaddafi vows to retake all rebel-held territory as the u.n. considers military action to stop him. and from hiroshima to fukushima, her fear that japan is on the verge of another nuclear catastrophe. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. there is so much concern in this country about nuclear radiation from jay japan that president obama went on national television today to try to calm every down. he said he does not expect harmful levels of radiation from those damaged reactors to reach hawaii, alaska, or the west coast. at the same time, the united states began evacuating americ
retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some stabilization, they admit the method had little effect in reducing temperatures at the plant. others say even if a power line reaches coolant pumps they might not work. >> this is a very severe situation. we need to keep coolings at the fuel so that it doesn't reach criticality.
disaster in the making in japan after a new blast rocks a new power plant there. also a deadly tour bus crash in new york and conflicting reports from the driver and passengers. this while we try to get to the bottom of what really happened. and rebel fighters hammered in libya as forces loyal to qaddhafi use warplanes to bomb stra taoepbl i can conditions. it's all now and live and "happening now" "happening now." we're go glad you are with us on this very busy monday morning. hi, everybody i'm jenna lee? i'm jon scott. "happening now" a new explosion at a japanese nuclear power plant raises fears of an all out meltdown. the fallout from that could reach across the pacific affectth west coast of the u.s. more powerful after shocks rocked japan today. a thousand bodies wash ashore on the devastated northeast coast of the country. raising the death toll officially now lis listed as tad 9.0 and the tsunami that hit just half wards. the details get worse by the day. >> reporter: absolutely. it's completely unbelievable. every day i go out it gets worse than the day before. i went down by t
. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, another setback in japan. workers again forced to evacuate as smoke pours from crippled nuclear reactors and concerns grow about the safety of japan's food supply. and another a.t.f. agent tells cbs news the agency encouraged gun dealers in this country to sell weapons to mexican drug cartels. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. for a third straight night, tripoli has come under attack from u.s. and allied forces as they establish a no-fly zone over libya. anti-aircraft fire lit up the sky as moammar qaddafi's army tried to defend against the attack. rebelss solidified their control in benghazi and launch and offensive to retake other cities. president obama said today the u.s. will turn over leadership of the operation to other nations within days. the president and british prime minister david cameron said qaddafi must go though they insisted he is not a target of the attacks. but a cruise missile attack last night may
. and we will as well. >>> back to the story that -- the radiation from the fallout in that crisis in japan. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthq
and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so indications are, it looks like the 50-mile evacuation was prudent. other countries around the world continue to do what they can do support the japanese as they lead this effort to address this challenge. we've had
on the disaster in japan. ten days after those nuclear reactors were damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, a new setback today in the recovery operation. workers were forced again to evacuate when smoke was spotted coming from two of the reactors. the official death toll from the disaster now totals 8,800, nearly 13,000 are still missing. now there are concerns about radiation in japanese pots and in sea water near the plant. bill whitaker has the latest including details about the plant's spotty safety record. >> reporter: it's a sign this crisis is far from under control. ten days after the fukushima plant was knocked out by japan's massive earthquake and tsunami and once again reactor three is spewing smoke a few hours later white smoke from reactor two. it's a mysterious and serious setback, one that prompted workers to evacuate and once again stopped efforts to stabilize the plant. over the weekend, there had been some encouraging signs. plant operators had reconnected electric cables to all six reactors for the first time since the crisis began. and after days of firefighters dousing react
you. >> i want to thank everybody for watching. "hardball" starts right now. >>> escape from japan. and heading to libya. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. happy st. patrick's day. leading off tonight, high anxiety. there's finally good news out of japan. the international atomic energy agency reports there is now electrical power in place and water is being pumped in lowering the pressure inside those reactors. this news comes after authorities were reduced to dumping water from helicopters and spraying water from fire trucks in a last-ditch effort to cool those spent fuel rods. in a moment, we'll hear from a ann curry on the ground and a commissioner and get a report from the ground in japan. >>> also, credibility gap. the widening chasm between what the japanese government is saying and what we can believe. it happened at three mile island. it really happened at chernobyl and now it's happening at japan, officials playing down the dangers. we'll try to bridge the credibility gap tonight. >>> plus, the nuclear disaster has once again turne
japan. we'll have answers for you here tonight. >>> the struggle of those rebels in libya to now get the upper hand as nbc's richard engel lives through a close call on the ground. >>> making a difference. with a combination of medical expertise and a higher power. >>> and a screen gem is gone. some say the last of the true movie stars. tonight we'll remember elizabeth taylor. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. we're still in the middle of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' head quarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is with us
evacuating americans from japan as danger levels remain high at the crippled nuclear plan this, despite new attempts by military helicopters to cool off the plant's overheated reactors and fuel rods. the top u.s. nuclear regulator says conditions at the plant are much worse than japanese officials say and recommends that americans say 50 miles away. this morning questions about nearly two dozen nuclear reactors with the very same design "early" this thursday morning, march 17th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning. welcome to "the early show" here on a thursday morning. scenes from earlier. military choppers, japanese military helicopters dropping sea water on this nuclear plant a part of the last-ditch effort to bring sea water in ho help cool down the fuel pools and also the nuclear rods there at this facility. >> that is the effort from the sky. also hearing about water cannons on the ground as they try to bring things in there. we are learning this morning that the pentagon is sending in teams to assess the situation and see in a larger military presence may be needed. also
health. >>> the body of the first american known to have per risched in japan's disaster has been pound. lee cowan has the story. >> reporter: before march 11th, most americans never heard. that district in japan. taylor anderson knew it in better days. the girl from richmond, virginia made it her home. >> she loved it. she loved the culture and the people. she loved teaching the japanese children. she was living her dream. >> reporter: she taught more than english. she taught compassion. she helped get people out until the time to save herself was gone. >> it took rescuers day to go through the debris. it seemed hopeless. yet, nine days in, a 16-year-old boy was found clinging to a roof, exhausted in cold but alive. he had saved his 80-year-old grandmother, too, after finding the refrigerator stocked with yogurt and coke. i always knew there was something special about it. her parents got a call she had been found. it was a mistake. she was still lost in all of that rubble. in a short statement, her parents wished what her daughters would have wished. please remain playing for all who
-- the struggle to contain stricken nuclear power plans. a new dawn in japan. new setback for a country desperately trying to regain control. [ man ] ♪ trouble ♪ trouble, trouble trouble, trouble ♪ ♪ trouble been doggin' my soul ♪ since the day i was born ♪ worry ♪ oh, worry, worry worry, worry ♪ [ announcer ] when it comes to things you care about, leave nothing to chance. travelers. take the scary out of life. how are you getting to a happier place? running there? dancing there? how about eating soup to get there? campbell's soups fill you with good nutrition, farm-grown ingredients, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. you think i have allergies? you're sneezing. i'm allergic to you. doubtful, you love me. hey, you can't take allegra with fruit juice. what? yeah, it's on the label. really? here, there's nothing about juice on the zyrtec® label. what? labels are meant to be read. i'd be lost without you. i knew you weren't allergic to me. [ sneezes ] you know, you can't take allegra with orange juice. thank you for joining
from japan's meltdown blows toward the u.s. and we are live inside the exclusion zone around chernobyl, still the site of the worst nuclear power plant. what it's like a quarter century later. >>> just moments ago libya's foreign minister said libya has decided to halt all military operations to "protect civilians" in line with the u.n. no-fly decision. they say the cease-fire will "take the country back to safety and ensure security for all libyans." we'll have much more on the u.n. decision, as well as libya's cease-fire declaration coming up this half-hour. >>> in japan, it is one week since the earthquake, then the tsunami which devastated the country's northeast. the death toll stands at 6,539. more than 10,000 people are still missing. >>> new video shows the extensive damage at the fukushima nuclear plant, multiple reactors now in danger of overheighting. one of the spent fuel pools may be even cracked. officials are considering burying the fuel rods in sand to prevent a wider catastrophe but the bigger dangerest may be at reactor three which contains plutonium. high intensity h
at the pentagon. >>> let's go to japan where fears continue to spread, the death toll continues to client. today marks one week after the massive earthquake and the devastating tsunami which battered the country. 6,911 are confirmed dead and another 10,000 are still missing. survivors across japan observed a moment of silence today at the exact time that the quake struck. many still wearing face masks, many of them still in shock. a lot of the survivors are huddling in nearby shelters. japanese media reporting some 380,000 people in shelters. what makes matters worse, some of the shelters with without power and facing freezing temperatures. some survivors are returning home for the first time since the tsunami like this retired firefighter. he lost his home and entire family. >> translator: my wife, my son's family and four grandchildren. i lost them all. >> as for the nuclear crisis, things are not looking much better in fukushima. japan's nuclear agency raised the crisis level on the damaged planted there. you're looking at it, from a four to a five. that raises it to the same level as three m
tougher attacks if he did nothing. >>> regulators in japan ignored safety warnings in one reactor and botched insus, are we competent the inspection system in this country is any better? >>> donald trump foreign policy. cheat moammar gadhafi out of his money. >>> we start with a deepening crisis in libya. nbc news chief correspondent richard engel standing by in benghazi, libya. the latest on theç ground. yesterday are you were pessimistic about the rebel force. some who have military training aren't using it. any better sign of their ability to move on tripoli today? >> reporter: no, still they are untrained and they don't have the capability to really take territory. this is something that the rebels themselves realize. i was speaking with some of the leaders of this revolt tonight and they were quite despondent. they are starting to look for outside help. they want military advisors on the ground from the united states. they said they are willing to hire them if necessary. but they recognize that if they don't get their acts together they are not going to be able to advance t
of intervention? >>> and disaster in japan. exhausted engineers struggle to get power restored at the country's crippled nuclear reactors. in the hopes of avoiding a meltdown. meanwhile, high levels of radiation begin to show up in food in japan, as the country's prime minister urges his people to show courage in the wake of their unspeakable tragedy. we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march 19th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> new york city waking up to a sunny saturday morning. the last saturday before spring begins. welcome to "the early show." i'm rebecca jarvis. >> and i'm russ mitchell. two major stories to get to this morning. we begin with libya. this morning libyan forces loyal to moammar gadhafi entered the outskirts of benghazi in eastern libya. opposition forces shot down a warplane that was bombing the city. the warfare continues as the libyan government denies its forces atacked benghazi and said it is observing a cease-fire. president obama warned mr. gadhafi must -- >> let me be clear. these
>>> wild weather this weekend in the bay area! more is on the way. and a crisis in japan gets even more critical as radiation seeps into food and the water supplies. and crews respond to a huge early morning fire in the east bay. >>> good morning. welcome to mornings on 2. it's saturday, march 19th. a wild weekend of weather is ahead of us after really what has already been a pretty wild 24 hours. we have a crew at one of our hardest hit areas, but let's check in first with rosemary to see what is happening right now. >> good morning to you! a lull in what we're looking at for the weekend. we had wild weather yesterday, the thunderstorms we know we had a small tornado in one of our local areas. but we do continue with this weather. getting a little break but a high wind watch expected to move into places overnight. yesterday we saw the gusts reaching 40 miles per hour. they could reach 60 in the overnight hours and tomorrow. we're also tracking radar, little light rain falling in some areas and we'll show you the very latest on that and when we expect the heaviest rain with this ne
that libya is sending gas prices to japan, americans are pessimistic about our economy. a new cnbc poll has 37%, more than a third now, say the economy will get worse in the next year. that is bad news. that's a 16-point rise in the bad news estimate since december. and the poll's all-time high we're really pessimistic about it now. >>> obviously the united states is pleased with yesterday's vote. it sent a strong message that needs to be heated. the efforts by the international community to come together to make clear to colonel gadhafi that he cannot continue violence against his own people. they cannot continue the attack that started out by peacefully demonstrating for changes that are within the right of any human being. >> well there you have it. secretary clinton. welcome back to hardball. secretary clinton today. what's next? the representative to the united nations, national securities reporter mark thompson. let me ask you -- i read two things at the same time. one through the united states through the president reading a particular u.n. resolution. we're going with a no-fly zone
next from the crisis in libya to japan, we will switch back to that big story. u.s. officials say the crisis in japan is worse than three mile island. category five. we will get to the latest to avertd a meltdown. castrol syntec has been reformulated for better performance under the hood. so we gave it a new name. castrol edge with syntec power technology. new name. better formula. it's more than just oil. it's liquid engineering. >>> welcome back to hardball. japan raised its rating to a five on a seven-point scale. the crisis now even surpassed three-mile island. that's the standard. there it is on the score on the grid. time is running out. workers raced to avoid a full-blown meltdown and more of the situation in the nuclear problem, the former senior nuclear power plant operator. and david albright, a former nuclears inspector and president for the institute of science international security. well, michael, let's go to the whole question. what does it mean to go to five? >> probably the more relevant point is is that it's a three-mile island. the real bottom line here is that
>>> good morning. breaking news. japan's nuclear crisis takes a dire turn. high levels of radiation spewing from the damaged nuclear plant following an explosion at a third reactor and a fire in a fourth. a company official calls it a very bad scenario, and the new concerns have the dow plummeting sharply today, tuesday, march concerns have the dow plummeting sharply today, tuesday, march 15th, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this tuesday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm matt lauer, there doesn't seem to be any more question about it. officials in japan are saying the radiation leaking from the crippled nuclear power plant is enough to impact human health. >> the biggest concern right now is the number 2 reactor which exploded on monday sending more radiation into the air and then a fire at reactor 4 broke out. that reactor had been shut down for maintenance before the quake. all but 50 employees of the plant have been evacuated. in a nationally televised address japan's prime minister urged anyone living near the plant who had not a
today as one of those troubled reactors in japan. why this could be the worst thing we've hed so far. we'll be right back. i was diagnosed with copd. i could not take a deep breath i noticed i was having trouble. climbing the stairs, working in the garden, painting. my doctor suggested spiriva right then. no announcer: spiriva is the only once-daily inhaled maintenance treatment for copd, which includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. love what it does. it opens up the airways. announcer: spiriva does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. stop taking spiriva and call your doctor right away if your breathing suddenly worsens, your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, have vision changes or eye pain, g or have problems passing urine. tell your doctor if you have glaucoma, problems passing urine, as or an enlarged prostate, as these may worsen with spiriva. also, discuss the medicines you take, even eye drops. ip side effects include dry mouth, constipation, and trouble passing urine. th it makes me breathe easier. i can't do everything i used to do. but there's a lot i
in japan, talking directly about the nuclear crisis for the first time. the president offering help and reassuring folks in the u.s. that they are safe. >> we are bringing all available resources to bear to closely monitor the situation and to protect american citizens who may be in harm's way. we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether it's the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. >> his comments coming amid raids of rising doubts about japan's ability to control this reactor and a potential full-on meltdown. the attempt to cool down the reactors by spreading them with water dropped out of helicopters apparently having little to no impact. restoring power to the plant not happening until tomorrow at the earliest, which would resurrect the water cooling systems. radiation levels at 300 feet above the plant measured today at nearly 9 r.e.m. by comparison, a chest c.t. scan has just about 0.7 r.e.m. you have to get up to 50 to 75 r.e.m. to get immediate symptoms like hair loss as a result of exposure. so, a lot of exposu
now go to anderson cooper with "ac 360" live from japan. >>> piers, it is truly an extraordinary development to find somebody alive eight days, particularly remarkable when you consider so many of the injuries and the deaths we've seen were caused by that tsunami with all that debris and fast moving water. remarkable that this person apparently survived that long. and also with freezing cold temperatures at night. we'll try to find out more details on that. also the latest on the nuclear emergency that is ongoing right now. in the fukushima daiichi plant. the latest information on that is that the japanese government is finally admitting that the situation has indeed been worse than previously acknowledged. the government giving a grimmer assessment of the disaster, raising the threat level to level five out of seven, conceding it is worse than they previously said, something america's top nuclear regulator has been saying for two days. the wind had been blowing out to sea. it is now blowing on shore. we'll tell you what that means for cities like tokyo. according to "the new yor
: now to japan. a u.n. expert says radiation continues to leak from those damaged nuclear reactors but progress is being made. all six reactors are now hooked up to power lines-- a step toward getting the cooling systems working once the electricity is turned on the number of workers at the plant is now up to a thousand. meanwhile, the official death toll from the earthquake and tsunami is approaching 10,000 with nearly 14,000 missing. more than a quarter million survivors have no homes or have been forced to leave them. from japan tonight, here's lucy craft. >> reporter: cardboard houses now home for thousands living on the floor of a sports arena outside tokyo. all survived the tsunami and quake only to be caught up in a radiation scare. this fifth grader says "we escaped to my school but when they said even that was not safe, we came here." natives of iwaki like to boast about its postcard scenery and mild climate. the now notorious fukushima nuclear plant only 30 miles away has triggered a mass exodus. "from all sides everyone kept telling us get out of here" says this beautici
concerns tonight about radiation in japan coming from those damaged nuclear reactors. trace amounts have now been picked up by air monitors in hawaii as well as stations in california, oregon, washington and colorado. authorities say it poses no threat to health. but in the quake zone in japan, the danger from radiation appears to be growing. nbc's chief science correspondent robert bazell reports. >> obviously things are not contained completely at this time. >> reporter: there are serious new concerns about reactor 3 at the fukushima site, which uses highly toxic plutonium in its fuel mixture. japanese officials now say there is a high possibility that the third reactor's fuel rods are damaged and it is leaking radioactive water from the reactor itself or from the pumping system being used to try to cool it. there are also concerns about high levels of radiation at 1 and 2. japan's prime minister called the situation grave and says it does not allow any optimism yet. the problem at reactor 3 was discovered when workers stepped into water that had 10,000 times the amount of radiation ty
the latest on the only confirmed american death in japan. >>> and thearents of a rutgers student who committed suicide after police say he was taunted for being gay don't want harsh punishment for those accused. >>> and could it be true? does cbs want charlie sheen back on his t ho >>anhepo enti's ltwnthela yi on to the streets of new york. what sent chris brown into a frenzy? >>> i'm tamron hall. the newsmation is following the latest developments in operation odyssey dawn in libya. crew members are back safe in american hands after the f-15e fighter jet crashed overnight. video of the wreckage. two airmen ejected after the plane developed mechanical problems. the fighter jet was on a strike mission against a libyan missile site. the on-scene commander of the international coalition for libya told a news conference, civilians are under attack by moammar gadhafi's forces in misratah and libya's third largest city. the admiral say the coalition is, quote, considering all objections but did not elaborate. among the coalition targets hit todayç libyan naval base in tripoli. lookin
. the focus simply on their survival in japan. they're either homeless or forced to evacuate their longstanding neighborhoods, and today there's anxiety about food safety. elevated levels of radiation have been detected. after the government banned sails of milk from the fukushima prefecture because of contamination and sales from leafy vegetables from areas as far away as 160 miles. doctor, as wee hearing about this, and simply the numbers are astounding, more than 400,000 people have been displaced. now they're getting the news that some of the food they've been having access to could be contaminated. what's the reaction, what's the response that these people are supposed to have to this? >> right now we really don't know all the information wire going to need to tell people what they can eat and what they can't. the problem with radiation, particularly as it deals with problems in the seawater is there's two kinds of radiation. one eye odied 31, and one cesium 37. the risk here for fish is that these foods, like fish, could concentrate these toxins just the way mercury con
nuear site in japan, the power has been restored. they warn it will take days and weeks before they can turn it on. >>> tim pawlenty explores a run in 2012. >>> four former president's together honors one, a rare washington tribute to bush. >>> they are trying to extend the no-fly zone west towards tripoli. jim maceda is live in the libyan capital. bring us up to date as to what happened overnight and this morning. >> reporter: well, yeah, there are a lot of moving parts right now, andrea. first of all, a little more detail on the f-15 crash. that occurred 24 miles east of benghazi. the two pilots are now in safe u.s. hands. that is a rebel controlled part of the country. all of the loyalists or the forces loyal to the regime pulled back from benghazi when the air strike started two days ago and are now about the new front line is about 80 miles south of benghazi. the plane shall as you mentioned, went down due to mechanical failure. it was not gunfire. the plane completely destroyed in the crash. the two pilots managed to pair shoot out. they landed in two separate fields. again, they
in japan. u.s. officials now say the nuclear crisis in japan is worse than three mile island. it's a category five. an we'll get to the latest in the effort to avoid a melt down. you're watching "hardball." >>> welcome back to "hardball." jan has raised its rating of that nuclear disaster to a level five on a seven-point scale and a former member of the nuclear regulatory commission from this country said the crisis surpassed three mile island. there it is on that grid. time is running out as workers feverishly race to prevent a full-blown meltdown and a nuclear chain reaction. more on the desperate situation. let's turn to mike it will freedlander, a former senior nuclear power plant operator and david albright, president of the institute for science and international security. well, mike, let's go to this whole question. what does it mean to go to five? >> well, probably the more relevant point is what does it mean to be similar to three mile island. the bottom line is we have a situation where the nuclear complex has been compromised as a result of a station blackout. the reac
radiation from that crippled nuclear power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged, not forced, to get out of the area. how great is the danger? >>> plus with hispanics making up 1 in every 6 americans and one in every 1 ever 4 children, the huge emphasis on the 2012 election. >>> finally, how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard when people like michele bachmann, sarah palin and donald trump are taking up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent d geis bghi, afr heldg up of da. whatapnetoy t ou ilia atoue en >> reporter: today we went out of benghazi. and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajdabiya. ajdabiya is partially held by gadhafi forces and partially held by the rebels themselves. there is street-to-street fighting in the city. in a way, this is progress, the rebels would not have been able to get this far if gadha
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